RING PROBABILITIES IN F#

A few months back I took a look at Elixir. More recently I’ve been exploring F# and I’m very pleased with the experience so far. Here is the ring probabilities algorithm implemented using F#. It’s unlikely that I will ever use Elixir again because having a powerful static type system provided by F# at my disposal is just too good. let rec calcStateProbs (prob: float, i: int, currProbs: float [], newProbs: float []) = if i (currProbs.

RING PROBABILITIES WITH ELIXIR

I’ve been hearing more about Elixir lately so I thought I’d take it for a spin. “Elixir is a functional, meta-programming aware language built on top of the Erlang VM. It is a dynamic language that focuses on tooling to leverage Erlang’s abilities to build concurrent, distributed and fault-tolerant applications with hot code upgrades.”

I’ve never really spent any time with Erlang but always been curious about it and the fact that it’s one of the best kept ‘secrets’ in many startups these days.

CORPORATE FUNDING FOR SHEN

It looks like it might be coming sooner than I thought. I’m sure Shenturions everywhere will find this news incredibly exciting for the future of Shen. I can’t wait to see how things progress.

PURELY FUNCTIONAL DATA STRUCTURES & ALGORITHMS : SELECTION SORT

Updated @ 2012-08-31 02:08:58 due to internet pedantry Previously, previously. According to Wikipedia : In computer science, a Selection sort is a sorting algorithm, specifically an in-place comparison sort. It has O(n2) time complexity, making it inefficient on large lists, and generally performs worse than the similar insertion sort. Selection sort is noted for its simplicity, and also has performance advantages over more complicated algorithms in certain situations, particularly where auxiliary memory is limited.

DEATH LIES ON HER, LIKE AN UNTIMELY FROST

Kuksi is famous for his Baroque-influenced assemblages that seem to splinter out like sculptural fractals, each component fused to another object or detail even smaller and intricate

PURELY FUNCTIONAL DATA STRUCTURES & ALGORITHMS : UNION-FIND (HASKELL)

Updated 08-23-2012 01:04:38 Replaced the use of Data.Vector with the persistent Data.Sequence which has O(logN) worst case time complexity on updates. A Haskell version of the previous code using the more efficient(access and update) persistent Data.Sequence type so that the desired time complexity is maintained for the union operation. – Disjoint set data type (weighted and using path compression). – O((M+N)lg*N + 2MlogN) worst-case union time (practically O(1)) – For M union operations on a set of N elements.

PURELY FUNCTIONAL DATA STRUCTURES & ALGORITHMS : UNION-FIND

It’s been a while since I last posted in this series. Today we look at the disjoint-set data structure, specifically disjoint-set forests and the complementary algorithm : union-find. In computing, a disjoint-set data structure is a data structure that keeps track of a set of elements partitioned into a number of disjoint (nonoverlapping) subsets. A union-find algorithm is an algorithm that performs two useful operations on such a data structure:

CODEBREAKER - A NEW FILM ABOUT THE LIFE OF ALAN TURING

CODEBREAKER tells the story of one of the most important people of the 20th century. Alan Turing set in motion the computer age and his World War II codebreaking helped save two million lives. Yet few people have heard his name, know his tragic story, or understand his legacy. In 1954, Turing committed suicide at age 41 after being forced to undergo hormone therapy to “fix” his sexual orientation. He left behind a lasting legacy and lingering questions about what else he might have accomplished if society had embraced his unique genius instead of rejecting it.

BAYES'S THEOREM IS MORE POWERFUL THAN JESUS

Richard Carrier puts forward a fantastic approach to verifying history in his latest book : Proving History: Bayes’s Theorem and the Quest for the Historical Jesus “… historian Richard C. Carrier proposes Bayes’s theorem as a solution to the problem of establishing reliable historical criteria. He demonstrates that valid historical methods—not only in the study of Christian origins but in any historical study—can be described by, and reduced to, the logic of Bayes’s theorem.

ALAN KAY ON PROGRAMMING TODAY (AND A FEW OTHER THINGS)

From a recent Dr. Dobbs interview : On adults – Binstock: So you called them on the lying. Kay: Yeah. But the thing that traumatized me occurred a couple years later, when I found an old copy of Life magazine that had the Margaret Bourke-White photos from Buchenwald. This was in the 1940s — no TV, living on a farm. That’s when I realized that adults were dangerous. Like, really dangerous.